Letters grouped by: War

FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. STATE INFORMATION BUREAU. POLITICIANS AND NEWSPAPERS. LAND LEGISLATION. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Nov. 28 1904; Jan. 11 1905. Mr. Carruthers should make haste to remove the beam from his own eye. Stung to the quick by the comments on New South Wales (and pos­sibly those on himself) outside the State, he is about to create a State “Information Bureau”. It is to cost “very little”, and is to act under the advice of our very able statistician Mr. T. A. Coghlan, whose many most useful publications, as the Premier naively remarks, have heretofore been overlooked. The…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. ARBITRATION IN TRADE DISPUTES. EFFICACY OF THE REFERENDUM. REDISTRIBUTION OF SEATS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 26 1904; Mar. 5 1904. Our new Governor-General and Lady Northcote have been installed with due ceremony at Melbourne, where they will remain for some weeks prior to making a stay in Sydney. They have already enjoyed glimpses of Perth and Adelaide, where they landed unofficially on the way to the present seat of government. When they leave us Brisbane and Hobart will expect to be visited, so that probably twelve months will have passed before they…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. WESTERN PACIFIC ISLANDS. SOUTH AFRICAN LABOUR. ATTITUDE OF NEW ZEALAND. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 19 1904; Feb. 25 1904. The departure of Lord Tennyson affords another landmark in the story of the Commonwealth. He leaves South Australia this week as Governor-General, and though he will touch our soil again a few days later at Perth, he will then be free from all ties of office. It was in Adelaide five years ago that he began his career as the Queen’s Representative for the colony of which it is the capital, and it is in the same charming city that he now…
­­THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. MR. CHAMBERLAIN’S POLICY. “IMPERIAL IN EVERY SENSE.” CRYING WANT OF AUSTRALIA. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 13 [Jan. 5] 1904; Feb. 15 1904. The invitation to Mr. Chamberlain to visit Australia for the purpose of personally unfolding his policy of preferential trade came to us as a New Year’s Day surprise, and created a wide- spread sensation. Some months ago the possibilities of his coming were discussed in the Press, and the late Government was unsuccessfully interrogated on the prospect. Doubtless it was then felt that Mr. Chamberlain, though relieved…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. NAVAL DEFENCE. FEDERAL CONTRIBUTION. OBJECTIONS TO THE SCHEME. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Nov. 11 1902; Dec. 22 1902. Imperial questions are at present to the fore in most of the States, the return of the Prime Minister and his addresses explanatory of the resolutions adopted at the recent conference in London furnishing the topic of the hour. For the sake of their acceptance it is unfortunate that Mr. Chamberlain’s leisure will not permit him to visit Australia as well as South Africa, for without a personal acquaintance with our people and their problems a…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. SIR G. TURNER’S BUDGET. STATE AND FEDERAL RIVALRY. THE CRY AGAINST THE UNION. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Sep. 30 1902; Nov. 8 1902. The Federal Budget for 1902–3 constituted another success for Sir George Turner for his painstaking zeal, indefatigable industry, scrupulous precision of statement, and soberness of judgment. If his mind were a calculating machine, his speech could not have been more dispassionate or less imaginative. Without a flash of humour or a flight of fancy, an unhackneyed metaphor, or a glint of enthusiasm, he plodded his way prosaically…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. CONSTITUTIONAL REFORM. SHAPING THE TARIFF BILL. FEDERAL DIVISIONS. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Sep. 2 1902; Oct. 9 1902. The spring rains have continued, but they are still far from slaking the thirst of soils parched to dust by eight years of deficient supply. The encouraging feature is that light as the falls have been everywhere they have been widely dispersed and intermittently scattered over the past fortnight. From this it is augured that a real change has come from which further rains may be reasonably anticipated. Victoria, which has hitherto been…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. IMPERIAL PATRIOTISM. DOWNING STREET CONFERENCE. DISSATISFACTION AND RELIEF. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Aug. 26 1902; Oct. 3 1902. Imperial Federation is a popular watchword. Imperialism is unpopular. The distinction between them expresses the attitude of Australia so far as it has yet found expression. For the most part our ideal is a matter of sentiment. The strength of the movement arises from its emotionalism. The feeling of unity of race is the wool out of which the fabric of the future constitutional development has to be woven. It exists everywhere,…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. POLICY OF RETRENCHMENT. FEMALE SUFFRAGE. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Aug. 19 1902; Sep. 24 1902. The arrival of the Drayton Grange and the Britannic, overcrowded with our returning soldiers, afflicted with epidemics, with insufficient medical provision and boat or raft accommodation, and manifest want of discipline, is the most unfortunate incident for us of the whole South African Campaign, because it is exercising the worst influence on public opinion. A Royal Commission appointed by the Federal Government, consisting of three leading members of Parliament…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. IN THE GRIP OF THE DROUGHT. TROOPS RETURNING. EMPLOYMENT PROBLEM. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Aug. 5 1902; Sep. 16 1902. The monotony of references to the drought faithfully reflects the monotony of its persistence. Our winter rains are falling lightly and only on the highlands. The immense Australian steppes which stretch from the Gulf of Carpentaria to beyond the Murray and from the coast range on the east right across the continent are lying absolutely barren. In many parts of these there is no wish for showers at present. If they came they could not…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. FINANCIAL PRUNINGS. FEDERAL AND STATE POLITICS. CONSTITUTIONAL REFORMS. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 22 1902; Sep. 2 1902. When the Earl of Hopetoun was sworn in at Sydney as Governor-General it was in the presence of tens of thousands of eager spectators assembled from all Australia and beyond it to witness the celebration of the birth of the Commonwealth. Lord Tennyson, his successor, took the same oaths as Acting Governor-General at Melbourne last week before three or four hundred invited Victorian guests assembled in the great hall of Parliament House…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. DROUGHT AND REVENUE. OFFICIAL RETURNS ANALYSED. FEDERAL RESOURCES. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 8 1902; Aug. 15 1902. To make clear the Australian position one must begin, as usual, by recognising that it embraces many contradictions, and proceed by distinguishing, not merely between States, but, particularly at the present time, between our wet and dry areas. All New South Wales and all Queensland beyond their coastal ranges and outside of Riverina still suffer from the blight of the most disastrous drought the continent has ever known. Whether it is the…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. ATTACHMENT TO THE KING. IMPERIALISM IN THE STATES. CORONATION HONOURS. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 1 1902; Aug. 13 1902. The news of his Majesty’s illness has excited the profoundest sympathy among all Australians. The same spontaneous indications of popular feeling followed as are remembered to have occurred during his former critical illness at Sandringham. The public attachment to the Sovereign was manifested in scores of ways throughout the continent. All celebrations were promptly adjourned, and where the holiday proclaimed was not revoked it became…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. PEACE REJOICINGS. RAVAGES OF THE DROUGHT. FEDERAL RESPONSIBILITIES. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jun. 3 1902; Jul. 17 1902. Australian emotion has found another outlet in the proclamation of peace. Everywhere the joy bells were ringing, impromptu hastily-summoned patriotic meetings were held, every hamlet and settlement gave itself up to rejoicings, and our whole people seem to be inclined to forget all the months of waiting and watching that have now expired. When the Earl of Hopetoun leaves us by way of Brisbane for Canada he will be succeeded by Lord…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. DROUGHT AND DEBT. INTER-IMPERIAL TRADE. FINANCIAL REFORMS. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jun. 3 1902 [May 27]; Jul. 11 1902. Monotonous as the inevitable references to the persistence of the drought must be, its immense area, its unprecedented duration, and the deadliness of its many consequences, direct and indirect, are so much the chief factors of the situation that it is impossible to ignore them. What it means in the way of loss and misery to thousands and tons of thousands it is almost impossible to calculate, and the untold sufferings of the millions of…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. IMPERIAL DEFENCE. TRADE RECIPROCITY SCHEMES. THE POLITICAL ATMOSPHERE. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, May 13 1902; Jun. 21 1902. Australia’s area is always impressive. A fortnight ago Mr. Barton bade farewell to Sydney, a week ago to Melbourne, and yesterday to Perth. He is only just out of sight of the shore of his native land, though were he to turn back he must travel continuously by land and sea for a week before arriving at his home and birthplace in this city. The Melbourne banquet tendered to him by the Mayor of the city, Sir Samuel Gillott, was an…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. DROUGHT AND DISTRESS. FEDERAL FIELD FORCES. ORGANISATION FOR DEFENCE. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, May 6 [Apr. 29] 1902; Jun. 12 1902. The drought continues over the inland area, which has suffered most, and is in direst need of rain. Seasonable showers have fallen along the coast ranges, and here and there have drifted some little distance beyond. Speaking generally, however, there has been no relief, and the tales of distress accumulate with the prolongation of the dry weather. By means of the railways fodder is being poured into the interior, where many…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. DROUGHT DESOLATION. DEMAND FOR REFORMS. RETRENCHMENT MOVEMENT. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Apr. 15 1902; May 23 1902. Public affairs in Australia were never more dependent on its physical conditions than they are to-day. Any faithful picture of them must dwell rather on the black background of drought and debt than the narrow foreground filled by political events and Parliamentary figures of note. A belt of mountains runs from the Gulf of Carpentaria roughly parallel with the ocean down the whole east coast of the continent through Queensland and New South…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. AUSTRALASIAN EXPANSION. WESTERN PACIFIC PROBLEMS. NEW IMPERIAL CENTRE. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Mar. 11 1902; Apr. 17 1902. The Commonwealth has taken its first plunge into the troubled waters of the Pacific. British New Guinea has been formally transferred to its care, and constitutes its earliest dependency. Henceforward, pending Federal legislation, the Governor-General will take the place vacated by the Governor of Queensland, and will control it under the advice of his Ministers as if it were a Crown Colony in his charge, directly instructing his…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. CORONATION CONFERENCE. UNITY OF THE EMPIRE. ANGLO JAPANESE TREATY. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY. Feb. 18 1902; Mar. 25 1902. Imperial issues still engross the attention of Australians. The despatch of the first half and the organisation of the second half of the Federal contingent has focussed interest on the relations between the Commonwealth and the Mother Country. The treaty with Japan has revived the problems of the Far East and our interest in them. The Coronation is attracting much attention, not merely as a great ceremonial of special significance at the…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. COLONIAL LOYALTY. EARL OF HOPETOUN’S POPULARITY. VICEREGAL SPEECH CRITICISED. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Feb. 4 1902; Mar. 12 1902. The Earl of Hopetoun’s speech in Melbourne has been challenged in Parliament partly because it affected a party issue, but chiefly because it offended public sentiment. When he announced his endorsement of Mr. Barton’s delay in offering a Federal contingent for South Africa he offended that sentiment and invited rejoinder. What was said in the House of Representatives was wide of the real grievance, which was neither political…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. LORD HOPETOUN’S AVOWAL. STATE JEALOUSIES. SOUTH AUSTRALIAN PROBLEMS. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 28 1902; Mar. 6 1902. The Earl of Hopetoun has created a political sensation. The 26th of January is celebrated annually by the Australian Natives’ Association in Melbourne, its home of origin and head centre of influence. It was at this gathering, in our most Imperialistic capital and to an audience overflowing with loyal enthusiasm and martial spirit, that he deliberately, decisively, and dramatically departed from the reserve which he and  all our…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. AUSTRALIA AND THE WAR. THE PEOPLE’S LOYALTY. MINISTERIAL AWAKENING. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 21 1902; Feb. 26 1902. Australia is drawing a deep breath of relief and the popular aspiration is at last satisfied. The Commonwealth has spoken and acted, its Government and Opposition have united, and their patriotism has been proved beyond all question. One thousand irregulars are about to depart for the scene of conflict, and more are to follow them as the need arises. The current opinion on the situation which is expressed here is that the war should be…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. FIRST YEAR’S RECORD. PARTY STRUGGLES AND AIMS. PROSPERITY OF THE STATES. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 14 1902; Feb. 20 1902. One of the features in the first year’s record of the Commonwealth has been the success of the Governor-General in his official capacity, and one of its good fortunes the gradual restoration of his physical health. Our summer heat appears to be preferable to him to the mild winter weather of Hobart and Melbourne. A few months ago he spent his holiday in Northern Queensland in order to enjoy more sunshine than Sydney could afford,…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. AUSTRALIA AND THE WAR. FURTHER TARIFF PROBLEMS. MINISTERIAL DIFFICULTIES. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 7 1902; Feb. 11 1902. The Commonwealth begins its second year by no means free from the ailments of infancy. It cannot be said to have cut its teeth, for it has not yet united its State Defence Departments. Nor, if the tariff may be likened to an attack of whooping cough, can the little patient be considered half through that very serious complaint, painful to itself and distressing to its neighbours. The results of the radical treatment adopted to…