Letters grouped by: Governor General

THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA. CRISIS IN QUEENSLAND. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Dec. 2 1907; Jan. 8 1908. English readers who wish to understand the crisis in Queensland must commence by mentally transferring themselves to the Antipodes. Here they find acting in the name of his Majesty the King a temporary representative with strictly-defined powers in a strictly-defined area engaged in a struggle with an elective Chamber also of limited authority, and both of them subject to local pre­cedents that do not apply to the United Kingdom. Getting rid of the several prepossessions aroused…
COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA. LABOUR AND THE MINISTRY. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 8 1907; Aug. 17 1907. Parliament has opened; to be more accurate several Parliaments have opened, and in a few days more there will be seven of them in full play. Setting aside the six State Legislatures whose performances provide plenty of entertainment for onlookers and of material for thought to the more seriously inclined the English observer is likely to find in the National Senate and House of Representatives quite enough to occupy any leisure of his for political inquiry. There is a Governor-…
THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA. MR. DEAKIN ON THE IMPERIAL CONFERENCE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jun. 24 1907; Jul. 31 1907. The Governor-General, having concluded his visit to the Northern Territory, is now on his way to Sydney. His Prime Minister, after spending a few hours in Perth, has passed on to Melbourne, having travelled some 2,000 miles since he first touched Australian soil. Lord Northcote will have journeyed just as far by the time he meets his Ministers in Melbourne, though the two between them will have only circumnavigated two-thirds of the continent in their passages…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE NAVAL AGREEMENT FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Apr. 10 1907; Jun. 4 1907. We have just seen the departure for England of some forty Australian and New Zealand bluejackets who have served their term in the locally manned ships of the Australian Squadron, and are now, under recently devised regulations, going to England to complete their naval training. It is understood that they will qualify themselves by service on board ship or in naval schools to fill the higher ratings in the Service, and will then return to Australia to act as instructors or petty or warrant…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. IMPERIAL CONFERENCE PROPOSALS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Feb. 25 1907; Apr. 20 1907. The Governor-General opened the Federal Parliament in state on Wednesday last, both Houses after listening to his Speech adjourning before the dinner hour. On Thursday evening early the Address in reply was carried in both on the voices. The first real sitting and the session closed together. On Friday his Excellency prorogued Parliament by proclamation. Not unnaturally our public gasped in bewilderment. Popular sentiment of a kind was satisfied because another record had been…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. EXCLUSION OF COLOUR. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 21 1907; Mar. 6 1907. The “White Australia” policy means to British critics little or nothing more than the exclusion of Chinamen from the Commonwealth. Obviously this is but part, and the smaller part, of the problem of our unoccupied continent. His Excellency the Governor-General, who has a happy knack of identifying himself with popular sentiment here, while at the same time unostentatiously directing it into healthy activities, has insistently kept the necessity for immigration before the people.…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. GREAT ISSUES AT STAKE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Nov. 12 1906; Dec. 22 1906. An Imperialistic note struck by the Governor-General vibrated through all the speeches at the Melbourne Lord Mayor’s banquet on the King’s Birthday. Touching lightly upon the need for immigration, his Excellency dwelt with impressive sincerity upon the necessity for pressing on with our organisation for defence. Rapidly running over the long list of wars he recollected within his own lifetime, including several in which Great Britain had taken part, he uttered a very serious warning to…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. MR. SEDDON’S LAST WARNING. THE NEW SESSION. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jun. 11 1906; Jul. 19 1906. The sudden death of the Right Hon. Richard Seddon, of which we heard this morning, came as a shock, but not wholly a surprise. He returned to Sydney on Saturday morning, having transacted business with Sir William Lyne in the train until after midnight. Then followed a very busy day, a farewell dinner, a theatre party and late supper, after which he boarded the Oswestry Grange in the early hours of Sunday morning. He had been living at this rate and under the same…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE JAPANESE SQUADRON. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, May 28 1906; Jul. 17 1906. The harbour near the city never looked more beautiful than a week ago, when the half-moon frontage of Circular Quay sparkled with innumerable electric lights of welcome to the visiting Japanese Squadron. On the other side of Government House grounds Farm Cove was filled with dazzling light from the Powerful and sister ships of the British Fleet. The throng of large, brilliantly-glowing ferry boats on their several routes crossed and recrossed each other more rapidly than usual. Few, if…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. A “CINDERELLA” PROVINCE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, May 14 1906; Jul. 4 1906. Our pleasant autumn weather has been system­atically utilised of late for touring. The Governor-General has made acquaintance for the first time with the chief townships of the north­west fed from the great plains stretching to the far interior for which they are the railway termini. Orange and Bathurst at high elevations are summer resorts, agriculturally prosperous and enjoying a delightful climate. Dubbo and Bourke, on the other hand, face a torrid heat in January and February, which…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE PREMIERS’ CONFERENCE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Apr. 9 1906; Jun. 1 1906. The Premiers’ Conference is now in full swing in this city, and in most respects follows the customs established by previous gatherings con­fined to the States. Mr. Carruthers presides, and the proceedings are in private. But in other respects it differs first in being incomplete and next because its business has been carefully con­cealed up to the last moment. That Western Australia should be unrepresented is serious; that the public should have been left in ignorance of the questions…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE WORK OF LAST YEAR. NEW SOUTH WALES. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 8 1906; Feb. 27 1906. The political year in New South Wales closed with a flourish of trumpets, an anti-Federal flourish; otherwise it had proved more effective for party interests than for practical legislation. Mr. Carruthers began this Parliament the not too well trusted leader of a party with a very narrow majority. The first session closed with very frank and unfavourable criticism upon his proceedings from the Sydney Press and with a scanty record of useful work. He carried over to the…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. SESSION CONCLUDED. THE MEASURES PASSED. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Dec. 26 1905; Feb. 3 1906. The second and central session of the Federal parliament has just closed as if by sheer exhaus­tion, members separating in hurried flights day by day until there was not a quorum of the House and hardly more than a quorum of the Senate to attend Prorogation. The first session began as this closes, with Mr. Deakin in control, but so much has happened since March, 1904, when he laid the programme of a reconstructed Barton Cabinet before members fresh from their election,…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. ADMINISTRATIVE QUESTIONS. THE FEDERAL CAPITAL. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Dec. 4 1905; Jan. 16 1906. The Commonwealth Parliament is making a chequered record, awakening fierce hostility while doing some things to redeem its character. The new Standing Orders prevent that reckless waste of time by its least practical members which has long sullied its records. Last week the Trade Marks Bill was discussed under their shadow with an effort at relevancy to which the reports of its debates have long been strangers. On the other hand, although the legalisation of trade…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE PRESS AND POLITICS. FEDERAL CAPITAL SITE. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Aug. 8? 1905]; Sep. 27 1905. Unrest is the prevailing political temper, despite the encouraging reports from every part of the Commonwealth upon the financial prospects of the year. The basis of business is sound, and banking is better than it has been for years; general trade is steady, while rural prospects are most hopeful. What more could be desired? Save that, as is usual at this slack season of the year, there are a few hundred men unemployed in one or two State capitals there is not a…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. NEW MINISTRY’S POLICY. OPPOSITION CRITICISM. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Aug. 1 1905]; Sep. 19 1905. The new Federal Ministry has made its debut in Parliament in such a manner as to advertise at the same time its attitude and policy. The Prime Minister in the House and Senator Playford, who leads in the Senate and holds the portfolio of Defence, respectively read to their rather astonished hearers in a few moments a long list of measures catalogued in a type-written document. This was the Ministerial manifesto, which was original in brevity and in the manner of its…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE FALLEN MINISTRY. DEFEAT INEVITABLE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 3 1905; Aug. 11 1905. What will happen next in our politics is never easy to predict, but the present crisis has no peculiarly Australian character. When the materials for an explosion are lying close together, as they have been in the Federal Parliament for many months, any spark from anywhere will produce a catastrophe. Readers of the Morning Post at all events cannot have been surprised when the cable told them that Mr. Reid’s Ministry had fallen. It was always plain that this might occur…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. VACATION SPEECHES. NEWSPAPER CRITICISM. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Mar. 21 1905; May 8 1905. Although it may seem to savour of provincialism to discuss Commonwealth interests in the light of New South Wales politics, yet, nothing else is possible at the moment. Sydney is, for the time being at all events, the “hub” of Australia. We have the Prime Minister in residence, and when the Governor-General arrives in a few days we shall feel that the actual capital is here. Both Lord and Lady Northcote are at least as great favourites with us as they are in Mel­bourne,…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. PARLIAMENTARY RECESS. REVIEW OF WORK DONE. PREFERENTIAL TRADE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Dec. 20 1904; Feb. 13 1905. The Federal Session is over, after lasting so long that the only surprise exhibited is that it should have ever ceased. For a considerable time the House has seemed too weak and too divided even to agree to close its doors. In all its ten months’ strenuous existence it could not and did not agree to anything else worth mentioning. It is true that the prorogation speech read by his Excellency emitted a lyrical undertone of rapture, probably…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. LABOUR PARTY TACTICS. UPPER HOUSE PREVAILS. CHANCES OF PREFERENCE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Dec. 12 1904; Jan. 25 1905. The Arbitration Bill becomes law when Lord Northcote signs it this week on behalf of his Majesty, after a career which surely may be quoted for all time as the very flower of topsy-turveydom. His Excellency will accept it on the advice of Mr. Reid, who denounced the whole measure lock, stock, and barrel, when it was first launched in this State four years ago. He fought its progress at every step with the most unqualified antagonism. When it…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. INFLUENCE OF GOVERNORS. TRADE IN NEW SOUTH WALES. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Oct. 4 1904; Nov. 24 1904. The Governor-General and Lady Northcote have concluded their first sojourn in New South Wales under the happiest conditions. They are now as well known in our capital as in that of Victoria, and have also put themselves into personal relation with many parts of the interior of the State. Lord Northcote has had no easy path to tread since he first entered the Commonwealth less than a year ago. Three Prime Ministers have tendered him advice already, and a fourth…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. POSITION OF THE LABOUR PARTY. INSECURITY OF LIBERAL SEATS. PREFERENTIAL TARIFFS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Sep. 27 [Sep. 20] 1904; Nov. 12 1904. Federal politics at present evoke almost as much excitement as a test cricket or football match, and, pace Mr. Kipling, no higher praise of their attractions could be uttered in Australia. Mr. Reid, wiser by the experience of his two predecessors, whose Cabinets consisted solely of members of their own parties, constructed his on the coalition principle, felicitating himself, “good easy man”, on widening his base by…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. LABOUR CABINET’S FALL. ARBITRATION AND TARIFFS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Aug. 15 1904; Sep. 30 1904. Our first Labour Ministry has fallen. The fatal Arbitration Bill has found another and congenial victim. Not long ago the Queensland section of the Labour Party under Mr. Dawson walked into the departments in that State for a few hours, only to be walked out of them whenever they faced the Assembly. The Daglish Ministry, just formed in Western Australia, does not seem likely to retain office longer than is necessary for the majority opposed to it to settle…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE COMMONWEALTH AND THE STATES. CONSTITUTIONAL PRINCIPLES. WORK OF THE HIGH COURT. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [May 10 1904]; Jul. 18 1904. Sydney is once more the centre. The Governor-General and Lady Northcote have arrived, receiving a ceremonious, official, and cordial popular welcome. They have gone for the coming three months into residence at Government House, where they will dispense the same generous but discriminating hospitality that proved successful beyond expectation in Melbourne. We have had representatives of the King who have been too lavish and…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE LABOUR SECTION. THREE PARTY STATUS. MINORITY RULE. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [May 3 1904]; Jul. 8 1904. Federal politics continue to absorb attention in spite of the stir in our own State and across the border in Victoria. Politics, that is to say, absorb the attention available in Sydney for public affairs, which is always, more or less limited. Just now there are many demands. We have a general election approaching, big with interest to our citizens. A similar condition exists over the Murray and in remote Western Australia, but the one crisis in being…