Letters grouped by: Cook

THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA. WAGES BOARDS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Oct. 14 1907; Nov. 20 1907. The battle over Preference has not more than begun. It is true that a Preference is secured for British wire netting, but none of the several curious votes taken before this was accomplished, almost incidentally, was really governed by fiscal considerations alone. Country districts have been inflamed with extravagant predictions of the increase in cost to graziers and farmers if the Government’s proposals were endorsed until some staunch Protectionists succumbed to the canard and…
THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA. MR. CARRUTHERS’S RESIGNATION. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Oct. 1 1907; Nov. 13 1907. Mr. Carruthers’s resignation comes like a bolt from the blue. Nothing could be more unexpected. His health has been bad for some years, and especially since he became head of the Government. Its effect upon him explains a good many minor incidents, outbreaks, and escapades that have injured his cause and reputation. These have compelled the critical to deal with them so frequently that the solid successes he has achieved have been less appreciated by a public always…
THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA. THE FEDERAL TREASURER. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Aug. 26 1907; Oct. 14 1907. Sir William Lyne, in his new offices of Federal Treasurer owing to Sir John Forrest’s retirement, and of Leader of the House during Mr. Deakin’s absence, has proved much more successful than his opponents are prepared to admit. He, too, returned from the Mother Country with enlarged prestige. The part he took in the Navigation Commission stands to his credit most, but the aggressive attitude adopted by him under the taunts of the Free Importers in London also tells in his…
COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA. ATTACKS ON MR. DEAKIN. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 15 1907; Aug. 21 1907. Australian politics, Federal and State, are still in a condition of ferment without getting to a clarifying stage. The session of our State Legislature was held rather to fulfil an undertaking than to accomplish any definite purpose, and vanished within a fortnight, leaving not a trace behind. It is true that Mr. Carruthers was attacked, and this time openly, for his professional relations with one of the cases included in the Land Office scandals. Speaking from memory he had…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. IMPERIAL CONFERENCE PROPOSALS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Feb. 25 1907; Apr. 20 1907. The Governor-General opened the Federal Parliament in state on Wednesday last, both Houses after listening to his Speech adjourning before the dinner hour. On Thursday evening early the Address in reply was carried in both on the voices. The first real sitting and the session closed together. On Friday his Excellency prorogued Parliament by proclamation. Not unnaturally our public gasped in bewilderment. Popular sentiment of a kind was satisfied because another record had been…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE KANAKA PROBLEM. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 14 1907; Mar. 5 1907. The Blayney election is the important incident of the week for New South Wales, because it repeats most emphatically the warning of the recent Federal election. Just as Mr. Reid has been defeated here Mr. Carruthers will be a few months hence, unless the omens change. Mr. Crick’s seat was vacated because of his connection with the Land Lease scandals. So far as the Legislature can go he has been placed under a perpetual political ban. But being still personally popular in his old district,…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE MINISTRY AND LABOUR. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Oct. 1?] 1906; Nov. 17 1906. If the Federal Parliament and its proceedings are faithfully portrayed in our daily papers its present state is as confused and ebullient as that of a witch’s cauldron. Large allowances must be made for the party spirit infused into these sketches. When carefully compared they prove full of self-contradictions, but after making due deductions on this score the evidence seems irresistible that the closing days of the session are even more chaotic than is customary in our Legislatures.…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. PREFERENCE AND BRITISH SHIPS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Oct. 1 1906; Nov. 8 1906. Last week was crammed with incidents and expositions of policy in the Federal Parliament sufficient to concentrate attention upon it, especially as the proceedings of our own Legis­lature in Sydney were only distinguished by a disorderly episode. In Melbourne the working of the three party system led to some curious and one most unfortunate occurrence. A new feature in the Bill granting a preference to British manufactures is a limitation of the concession to goods which are…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE NEW ZEALAND TARIFF. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Sep. 3 1906; Oct. 30 1906. Never did “a bolt from the blue” startle any one so much as the Prime Minister’s tariff preference to the Mother Country to our baffled Free Traders. Its campaign material, all to hand, collected with endless pains and at great cost, depended for its effect upon a continuance of the parliamentary regime of last year, when a great deal of most important legislation, passed in spite of them, happened to be general in its nature and without party colouring. That suits the Opposi­tion,…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. LABOUR AND THE MINISTRY. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. [Aug. 27 1906]; Oct. 25 1906. Australian politics exhibit rising temperatures; one general election is certain and another pro­bable this year, three more are due in the early part of next year. Out of our seven Legislatures only those of Western Australia and Tasmania, lately elected, appear to conform to the normal standard. All the rest are perturbed by the imminence of changes which affect the conduct of current affairs by anticipation. Commonwealth politics are at an extremely critical stage, party complications…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE BUDGET. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Aug. 6 1906; Sep. 25 1906. Last week Sir John Forrest established a record in the self-governing dominions when he intro­duced his thirteenth Budget to the House of Representatives. Eleven times in Western Australia as Premier and Treasurer, and twice in the Federal Parliament as Treasurer, it has fallen to his lot to propound the financial policy of the Government of the day. Even the late Mr. Seddon has been outdone in this particular respect. In another way, too, the Australian has had a singularly happy experience, since…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE VICTORIAN VOTE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 30 1906; Sep. 6 1906. The crux of the session and of the political situation generally will be reached very shortly. What is really most momentous in both, from a broad Australian point of view, may be matter for controversy; what is most interesting to Sydney is quite plain; but the really important question in Federal politics is unfortunately still miscon­strued in this State. Mr. Reid continues his round of political meetings in Queensland, delivering and redelivering familiar diatribes against communistic…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. GENERAL ELECTION TACTICS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, May 7 1906; Jun. 30 1906. Parliament meets on June 5, that is to say, the Commonwealth Parliament which at present is in the full focus of public attention assembles in Melbourne on that date. The State Legisla­tures will be summoned later, for none of them apprehend a dissolution this year, and all of them rejoice to have the critical eye of the country directed upon their big brother instead of them­selves. Two of those Ministerial transformations to which we have become accustomed in local politics have been…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. GROWING SURPLUSES. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Mar. 19 1906; May 8 1906. The year, which began with bursting barns and multiplying flocks, has since enjoyed the soaking rains and flowing streams that promise a favourable winter. Fattening herds and moist soil for sowing are now assured. The dry north has been more plenteously endowed than for ten years past, and appears about to return to the kindlier cycle of fruitful seasons to which it was accustomed until recently. These natural gains are no doubt the chief, though they are not the only, causes contributing to…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. ANTI-FEDERAL MEETING AT SYDNEY. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 22 1906; Mar. 8 1906. The Anti-Federal meeting in our Town Hall last Wednesday evening was the first fruit of Mr. Carruthers’s protest, and conveys the response of the people of this city to his appeal, though a little suburban gathering was contemporaneous. It was awaited with anxiety by onlookers far and near, because whatever the effect of the move­ment in the Commonwealth Parliament may be, all saw that its consequences would not end with this overture. There was its effect on State parties and…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. CHOICE OF CAPITAL SITE. ALTERNATIVE SUGGESTIONS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 2 1906; Feb. 13 1906. With the prorogations of all our Parliaments at the close of 1905 another chapter of Australian political history came to a conclusion. It is still impossible to summarise its contents, for the details of events in Western Australia are not to hand, and the exact results of the session even next door to us in Victoria or Queensland are only partially capable of being assessed. But whatever their records may show, the continuous hegemony of New South Wales is…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. CLOSING THE SESSION. AN ANTI-TRUST BILL. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Dec. 18 1905; Jan. 31 1906. Christmas Day is but a week hence, and yet the quiet of the season has not settled down upon the Legislatures of the Commonwealth or of Western Australia. In the former Prorogation Day is not yet fixed. The Prime Minister clings with tenacity to his original determination to finish his programme or perish in the attempt. Except so far as the latter alternative applies to the health of individual members, and particularly to his own, little apprehension need be…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. PARLIAMENTARY CLOSURE. THE TRADE MARKS BILL. LORD JERSEY’S WELCOME. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Nov. 27 1905; Jan. 4 1906. The Federal Parliament has won in the House a closure more complete than that which the Senate has possessed for a long time without ever putting it in force. What our papers call “the great stonewall” of obstruction, reared in “the greatest political battle in Australia”, broke down badly by a capitulation of the Oppo­sition, which the same papers are now endeavour­ing to disguise as best they can. Mr. Reid’s party set out first to prevent…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. PARLIAMENTARY BUSINESS. WINDING-UP THE SESSION. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Nov. 20 1905; Dec. 29 1905. At last Federal politics have become popular, that is to say, interesting to the great mass of Australians who as a rule take little or no notice of them except at election times. What appeals to this large audience must be sensational, spectacular, or dramatic. Unless Parliament for the moment rivals the theatre it has no more attraction for them than the betting odds have for those who make no bets. Undoubtedly even a rough comparison of the rival charms of…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE PARLIAMENTARY SESSION. LEGISLATION ADOPTED. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Nov. 13 1905]; Dec. 27 1905. Interest centres or ought to centre in the Federal Session as it draws to its close. It would concentrate there if the approaching crisis were understood; but, assuming that the other States are no better informed than our own, there is probably little grasp of the situation anywhere. This is due in our case to the persistent translation of all Commonwealth events into the party politics of New South Wales, as seen through Sydney spectacles. One needs only to…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. PREMIER’S PROGRAMME. IMMIGRATION QUESTION. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Oct. 16 1905]; Dec. 5 1905. Immigration is still the touchstone, though it is being curiously applied. The fact that it pro­vides a popular cry is interfering with the immediate and visible success of the movement. All astute political leaders desire to annex it for themselves and to prevent others annexing it, or by strategic moves to oust them from their posi­tions of vantage in regard to it. To the cynical onlooker this may seem very amusing, but to the thoughtful the subject is too serious to…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE ANTI-SOCIALIST CRUSADE. QUESTIONS AT ISSUE. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Jun. 6 1905]; Jul. 20 1905. The political mists are commencing to disperse in New South Wales. In another week we shall witness the opening of our State Legislature and the organisation of Anti-Socialistic leagues throughout its whole domain. These, though Federal in their immediate purpose, will be local bodies as well in habitation and in aim. The Labour Party, Federal and State, is one, and has one chief “objective” which stands at the head of its programme and explains its nature. Stripped…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. MAIL CONTRACT QUESTION. THE ARBITRATION ACT. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Mar. 27 1905]; May 13 1905. The mail contract muddle is not yet disposed of, though there appears to have been much cor­respondence and many conferences between Mr. Sydney Smith, the Postmaster-General, and the Orient Company. Neither of them is the true principal in this matter, for Mr. Smith, most energetic and loyal of colleagues, merely makes the running for Mr. Reid, while behind the Orient Company is the commercial and banking community. It might have been supposed that under such…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. ANTI-FEDERAL TACTICS. THE FREE TRADE CAMPAIGN. “PLUNGING” POLICY RESULTS. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Apr. 15 [7?] 1902; May 20 1902. Australia politically was endowed with union rather than with unity. For this there can be no reproach that is not shared by all of us, since it was just this distinction which our Constitution makes, and was intended to make; nothing more was possible, and this was difficult to secure. Certain subjects were set apart on which we were to act as one people. This was the domain of the Commonwealth within whose range we were to be…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. POLITICAL ISSUES. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jun. 11 1901; Jul. 23 1901. Our royal visitors are now in New Zealand, where it is to be hoped they will be favoured with a continuance of the “Australian” weather, bright, clear, and sunny, which they have enjoyed on the mainland. In Sydney not even the shadows of the coming State elections, of the small-pox outbreak, or the iron strike could diminish the inexhaustible enthusiasm with which they have been received. The brilliant corps of British journalists who accompany them can paint the spectacles they have…