Letters grouped by: Colonial Office

THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA. INTER-STATE TROUBLES. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Nov. 4 1907; Dec. 21 1907. Australian politics are mixed and many coloured enough to remind their observers of a kaleidoscope. Every turn discovers some fresh combination of the old pieces, though, unlike the toy tube, these, if carefully watched, disclose a distinct development. We have at present a series of inter-State squabbles not without meaning and a few specially conspicuous incidents, such as the defeat of Mr. Moore, the West Australian Premier. A little while ago he asked Sir Frederick Bedford…
THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA. THE FEDERAL TREASURER. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Aug. 26 1907; Oct. 14 1907. Sir William Lyne, in his new offices of Federal Treasurer owing to Sir John Forrest’s retirement, and of Leader of the House during Mr. Deakin’s absence, has proved much more successful than his opponents are prepared to admit. He, too, returned from the Mother Country with enlarged prestige. The part he took in the Navigation Commission stands to his credit most, but the aggressive attitude adopted by him under the taunts of the Free Importers in London also tells in his…
THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA. MR. DEAKIN ON THE IMPERIAL CONFERENCE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jun. 24 1907; Jul. 31 1907. The Governor-General, having concluded his visit to the Northern Territory, is now on his way to Sydney. His Prime Minister, after spending a few hours in Perth, has passed on to Melbourne, having travelled some 2,000 miles since he first touched Australian soil. Lord Northcote will have journeyed just as far by the time he meets his Ministers in Melbourne, though the two between them will have only circumnavigated two-thirds of the continent in their passages…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE KANAKA PROBLEM. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 14 1907; Mar. 5 1907. The Blayney election is the important incident of the week for New South Wales, because it repeats most emphatically the warning of the recent Federal election. Just as Mr. Reid has been defeated here Mr. Carruthers will be a few months hence, unless the omens change. Mr. Crick’s seat was vacated because of his connection with the Land Lease scandals. So far as the Legislature can go he has been placed under a perpetual political ban. But being still personally popular in his old district,…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. GREAT ISSUES AT STAKE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Nov. 12 1906; Dec. 22 1906. An Imperialistic note struck by the Governor-General vibrated through all the speeches at the Melbourne Lord Mayor’s banquet on the King’s Birthday. Touching lightly upon the need for immigration, his Excellency dwelt with impressive sincerity upon the necessity for pressing on with our organisation for defence. Rapidly running over the long list of wars he recollected within his own lifetime, including several in which Great Britain had taken part, he uttered a very serious warning to…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE JAPANESE SQUADRON. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, May 28 1906; Jul. 17 1906. The harbour near the city never looked more beautiful than a week ago, when the half-moon frontage of Circular Quay sparkled with innumerable electric lights of welcome to the visiting Japanese Squadron. On the other side of Government House grounds Farm Cove was filled with dazzling light from the Powerful and sister ships of the British Fleet. The throng of large, brilliantly-glowing ferry boats on their several routes crossed and recrossed each other more rapidly than usual. Few, if…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. GROWING SURPLUSES. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Mar. 19 1906; May 8 1906. The year, which began with bursting barns and multiplying flocks, has since enjoyed the soaking rains and flowing streams that promise a favourable winter. Fattening herds and moist soil for sowing are now assured. The dry north has been more plenteously endowed than for ten years past, and appears about to return to the kindlier cycle of fruitful seasons to which it was accustomed until recently. These natural gains are no doubt the chief, though they are not the only, causes contributing to…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. LABOUR PARTY TACTICS. ARBITRATION ACT CHANGES. GENERAL ELECTION PROSPECTS. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Apr. 3? 1905]; May 16 1905. Decidedly we are doomed to the discontented year forecast in the Morning Post from its very opening, and as it grows old the discontent deepens. The situation is neatly brought home to us, this time from a new standpoint, by Mr. Dacey, M.L.A., in a short letter just published. All the opponents of the Labour Caucus are agreed that the present paralysis of private enterprise is due to its achievements in legislation, whereupon, as one of…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. VACATION SPEECHES. NEWSPAPER CRITICISM. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Mar. 21 1905; May 8 1905. Although it may seem to savour of provincialism to discuss Commonwealth interests in the light of New South Wales politics, yet, nothing else is possible at the moment. Sydney is, for the time being at all events, the “hub” of Australia. We have the Prime Minister in residence, and when the Governor-General arrives in a few days we shall feel that the actual capital is here. Both Lord and Lady Northcote are at least as great favourites with us as they are in Mel­bourne,…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. PARLIAMENTARY RECESS. REVIEW OF WORK DONE. PREFERENTIAL TRADE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Dec. 20 1904; Feb. 13 1905. The Federal Session is over, after lasting so long that the only surprise exhibited is that it should have ever ceased. For a considerable time the House has seemed too weak and too divided even to agree to close its doors. In all its ten months’ strenuous existence it could not and did not agree to anything else worth mentioning. It is true that the prorogation speech read by his Excellency emitted a lyrical undertone of rapture, probably…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. INFLUENCE OF GOVERNORS. TRADE IN NEW SOUTH WALES. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Oct. 4 1904; Nov. 24 1904. The Governor-General and Lady Northcote have concluded their first sojourn in New South Wales under the happiest conditions. They are now as well known in our capital as in that of Victoria, and have also put themselves into personal relation with many parts of the interior of the State. Lord Northcote has had no easy path to tread since he first entered the Commonwealth less than a year ago. Three Prime Ministers have tendered him advice already, and a fourth…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. GOSPEL OF IMPERIALISM. INTOLERABLE POLITICAL POSITION. THREE EQUAL PARTIES. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Feb. 9 [Feb. 2?] 1904; Mar. 14 1904. The Governor-General has delivered his first public speech under very appropriate auspices. The Australian Natives’ Association, much stronger in Victoria than in any other State, holds annual demonstrations in Melbourne and other capitals in celebration of the first settlement of the continent. It is attended by both Federal and State Ministers, who often take the opportunity of making important political statements of…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. ARBITRATION IN TRADE DISPUTES. EFFICACY OF THE REFERENDUM. REDISTRIBUTION OF SEATS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 26 1904; Mar. 5 1904. Our new Governor-General and Lady Northcote have been installed with due ceremony at Melbourne, where they will remain for some weeks prior to making a stay in Sydney. They have already enjoyed glimpses of Perth and Adelaide, where they landed unofficially on the way to the present seat of government. When they leave us Brisbane and Hobart will expect to be visited, so that probably twelve months will have passed before they…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. WESTERN PACIFIC ISLANDS. SOUTH AFRICAN LABOUR. ATTITUDE OF NEW ZEALAND. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 19 1904; Feb. 25 1904. The departure of Lord Tennyson affords another landmark in the story of the Commonwealth. He leaves South Australia this week as Governor-General, and though he will touch our soil again a few days later at Perth, he will then be free from all ties of office. It was in Adelaide five years ago that he began his career as the Queen’s Representative for the colony of which it is the capital, and it is in the same charming city that he now…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. PREMIERS’ CONFERENCE. POWERS OF SEPARATE STATES. CONFLICTING LOCAL INTERESTS. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Apr. 21 1903]; Jun. 26 1903. Easter has seen Sydney once more the acknowledged centre of the Commonwealth, and to all appearances as prosperous as ever. Never has the city been more crowded, more gay, nor holiday weather more propitious. The season opened brilliantly with the Governor-General’s ball, followed by the splendid display of the second Investiture. The functions also included a great garden party at Government House and an immense reception by the Lord…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. POWER OF THE CENTRAL GOVERNMENT. QUESTION OF STATE RIGHTS. COLONIAL OFFICE DECISIONS. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Jan. 19 1903]; Mar. 4 1903. Whether or not the Commonwealth is making history worthy of the name it is, at least, making itself a reality, which was in any case its first indispensable task. The familiar phrase prior to the actual acceptance of its constitution was that “Federation is in the air”, so much did every political question and social movement in the several colonies recall it as the prime necessity of our progress. In spite of the politicians,…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. LORD TENNYSON’S POPULARITY. GOVERNMENT HOUSE VOTE. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Nov. 25 1902; Jan. 2 1903. The appointment of Lord Tennyson as Governor-General, though only for one year, has been received with approbation throughout the continent. Yet the conclusions drawn from this undoubted fact by those who are at a distance would in all probability be wholly erroneous. It is not due to his personal gifts, great as they appear to be when exercised. We have only had his Excellency in Sydney twice since his appointment, and then merely on flying visits. He…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. ATTACHMENT TO THE KING. IMPERIALISM IN THE STATES. CORONATION HONOURS. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 1 1902; Aug. 13 1902. The news of his Majesty’s illness has excited the profoundest sympathy among all Australians. The same spontaneous indications of popular feeling followed as are remembered to have occurred during his former critical illness at Sandringham. The public attachment to the Sovereign was manifested in scores of ways throughout the continent. All celebrations were promptly adjourned, and where the holiday proclaimed was not revoked it became…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. PEACE REJOICINGS. RAVAGES OF THE DROUGHT. FEDERAL RESPONSIBILITIES. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jun. 3 1902; Jul. 17 1902. Australian emotion has found another outlet in the proclamation of peace. Everywhere the joy bells were ringing, impromptu hastily-summoned patriotic meetings were held, every hamlet and settlement gave itself up to rejoicings, and our whole people seem to be inclined to forget all the months of waiting and watching that have now expired. When the Earl of Hopetoun leaves us by way of Brisbane for Canada he will be succeeded by Lord…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. AUSTRALASIAN EXPANSION. WESTERN PACIFIC PROBLEMS. NEW IMPERIAL CENTRE. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Mar. 11 1902; Apr. 17 1902. The Commonwealth has taken its first plunge into the troubled waters of the Pacific. British New Guinea has been formally transferred to its care, and constitutes its earliest dependency. Henceforward, pending Federal legislation, the Governor-General will take the place vacated by the Governor of Queensland, and will control it under the advice of his Ministers as if it were a Crown Colony in his charge, directly instructing his…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. CORONATION CONFERENCE. UNITY OF THE EMPIRE. ANGLO JAPANESE TREATY. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY. Feb. 18 1902; Mar. 25 1902. Imperial issues still engross the attention of Australians. The despatch of the first half and the organisation of the second half of the Federal contingent has focussed interest on the relations between the Commonwealth and the Mother Country. The treaty with Japan has revived the problems of the Far East and our interest in them. The Coronation is attracting much attention, not merely as a great ceremonial of special significance at the…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. LORD HOPETOUN’S AVOWAL. STATE JEALOUSIES. SOUTH AUSTRALIAN PROBLEMS. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 28 1902; Mar. 6 1902. The Earl of Hopetoun has created a political sensation. The 26th of January is celebrated annually by the Australian Natives’ Association in Melbourne, its home of origin and head centre of influence. It was at this gathering, in our most Imperialistic capital and to an audience overflowing with loyal enthusiasm and martial spirit, that he deliberately, decisively, and dramatically departed from the reserve which he and  all our…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. TROOPS FOR THE FRONT. SHIPPING TROUBLES. OBSTINATE GERMAN OFFICIALS. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Dec. 24 1901; Jan. 29 1902. Christmas brings us no peace this year. On the contrary, it arrives, so to speak, sword in hand. There is, first, the great national issue as to how far our obligations to the Empire require us to offer further Australian reinforcements for South Africa. Besides the national problem, which has aroused great heat, anxiety, and impatience because of the non-committal caution and reticence of the Federal Ministry, we have forced on us an…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. OPPOSITION TACTICS. TARIFF SCHEDULE CONFLICT. MINISTERIAL TRIUMPH. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Dec. 10 1901; Jan. 15 1902. Australian politics have been passing through an eventful phase, with many dramatic episodes and stirring surprises. A game of chess between experts would be tame and circumscribed in comparison to the incessant evolutions of its living pieces. The moves on the board have been confined to no set scheme, but out of a “most admired disorder” are gradually developing important consequences. The Ministry, worsted in the House of…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. STRIFE IN PARLIAMENT. SETTLING THE NEW TARIFF. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Oct. 15 1901; Nov. 19 1901. The tariff has come, and with it consequentially a vote of want of confidence in its framers. The first was indispensable, the second inevitable. It should not be forgotten that the chief motive power of the Federal movement was generated out of the friction between the conflicting sets of customs duties in the several colonies. The one necessity everywhere recognised was that there should be a single Australian tariff instead of six. Without it any union…