Letters grouped by: Barton

THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA. LEGISLATIVE PROBLEMS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Dec. 30 1907; Feb. 11 1908. Whether our antipodean methods are really understood at home is even yet open to much doubt. It is difficult to bring home clearly to people who have always lived and are still living under a single Government, subject throughout the whole area of legislative control to one all-powerful Legislature, the nature of the problems with which Australia is now constantly being confronted. Behind many of our principal political questions lies a preliminary constitutional problem. We…
THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA. FEDERAL LABOUR PARTY. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Oct. 21 1907; Dec. 11 1907. Mr. Watson’s resignation of the Leadership of the Federal Labour Party and proposed retirement from politics at an early date is the event of the session. The effects likely to arise from it can hardly be over estimated if the special character of the man and the peculiar instability of our parties is taken into consideration. In consequence of federation the State Legislatures since 1901 have been led by men who were and would have remained subordinates but for the transfer of…
COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA. THE MURRAY RIVER. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 30 1907; Sep. 5 1907. The substantial unity of character of Australian politics is just now being illustrated conspicuously. Always visible to the careful observer, the likeness was formerly less marked in State Legislatures than it has become since the Federal Parliament has added another field for the exhibition of our tendencies as a people. Formerly when fiscal issues were in abeyance there were few real distinctions between State parties except that of “ins” and “outs”. While very gravely earnest as to…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE COMMONWEALTH CAPITAL. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, May 12 1907; Jul. 5 1907. SirJohn Forrest, the Acting Prime Minister, has been visiting Sydney, and his visit has revived the controversy over the Federal Capital site. All Sir John’s long experience in politics has not taught him the art of concealing thoughts that are likely to be unpalatable to his audience. In an interview on the first day after he arrived he announced that in his opinion the delay in fixing the Capital site was due to the action of the New South Wales Parliament. This is an opinion which…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE LAND SCANDALS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Apr. 16 1907; Jun. 25 1907. Of late, as is usual when there is no other question engaging public attention, a violent controversy has been proceeding in the columns of the Daily Press about the alleged wrongs that New South Wales is suffering at the hands of the Commonwealth. There is nothing fresh in the correspondence. The statement of the grievances of New South Wales is just as vague and shadowy as it has always been on similar occasions. The only complaint of which details are given concerns the failure of the…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE NAVAL AGREEMENT FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Apr. 10 1907; Jun. 4 1907. We have just seen the departure for England of some forty Australian and New Zealand bluejackets who have served their term in the locally manned ships of the Australian Squadron, and are now, under recently devised regulations, going to England to complete their naval training. It is understood that they will qualify themselves by service on board ship or in naval schools to fill the higher ratings in the Service, and will then return to Australia to act as instructors or petty or warrant…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE KANAKA PROBLEM. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 14 1907; Mar. 5 1907. The Blayney election is the important incident of the week for New South Wales, because it repeats most emphatically the warning of the recent Federal election. Just as Mr. Reid has been defeated here Mr. Carruthers will be a few months hence, unless the omens change. Mr. Crick’s seat was vacated because of his connection with the Land Lease scandals. So far as the Legislature can go he has been placed under a perpetual political ban. But being still personally popular in his old district,…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE “STATE RIGHTS” CAMPAIGN. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Dec. 22 1906; Feb. 6 1907. The recent election has illustrated the develop­ment of new party relationships. Out of our six States Queensland and South Australia are under coalition Administrations with Premiers who are members of the Labour Party. At present, owing to the Federal successes achieved by the Caucus, especially in the Senate, and to the resistance it encounters from the Legislative Councils of the several States, the Labour policy is to enlarge the sphere of the Commonwealth in order to enlarge…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE BUDGET. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Aug. 6 1906; Sep. 25 1906. Last week Sir John Forrest established a record in the self-governing dominions when he intro­duced his thirteenth Budget to the House of Representatives. Eleven times in Western Australia as Premier and Treasurer, and twice in the Federal Parliament as Treasurer, it has fallen to his lot to propound the financial policy of the Government of the day. Even the late Mr. Seddon has been outdone in this particular respect. In another way, too, the Australian has had a singularly happy experience, since…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE HIGH COURT. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 23 1906; Sep. 18 1906. The Commonwealth is still young, quite young enough to be studied for its promise as well as its performance. Every principal Act it passes deals with more than its immediate subject-matter. It shows a tendency. It establishes a precedent. It builds up some part of the new Federal structure which is beginning to overtop the State edifices conspicuously in places. Take the amending Judiciary Bill, which last week passed the House without amendment. Nothing could be simpler or shorter. For the…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. CONFERENCE OF PREMIERS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Mar. 13 1906; Apr. 20 1906. The Prime Minister is to meet the Premiers after all. When they assemble in Sydney on April 5 he will have his opportunity of saying as much as may seem expedient in relation to immigration and other Australian issues that he has at heart. But the Premiers will also have their chance and their say, and may be relied upon to take full advantage of the opportunity. It is to be hoped that both will be the better for the encounter. Nothing that promotes a better understanding between them…
Tags: Deakin, Barton
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. CHOICE OF CAPITAL SITE. ALTERNATIVE SUGGESTIONS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jan. 2 1906; Feb. 13 1906. With the prorogations of all our Parliaments at the close of 1905 another chapter of Australian political history came to a conclusion. It is still impossible to summarise its contents, for the details of events in Western Australia are not to hand, and the exact results of the session even next door to us in Victoria or Queensland are only partially capable of being assessed. But whatever their records may show, the continuous hegemony of New South Wales is…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE PARLIAMENTARY SESSION. FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Dec. 11 1905; Jan. 20 1906. Political events succeed each other so fast at this season of the year that it is impossible to keep pace with them. The unwritten law and practice of our Legislatures is to close their sessions before Christmas, always in a hurry, with a crush and with accompaniments of acrimony and confusion. Up till the last day or two Tasmania, where what may be termed parish politics prevail to a greater extent than else­where, was the only State where recess had been reached. A list of the…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. PUBLIC AFFAIRS. DEFENCE AND IMMIGRATION. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Sep. 11 1905]; Oct. 24 1905. The relative importance of recent developments in public affairs is certainly not apparent from the columns of our newspapers either in New South Wales or beyond its borders. They do not neglect much intentionally, and that only for party reasons, but establish no proportion between the space and prominence they accord to little local happenings or events of real magnitude and fruitfulness. The result is that their readers are left with at best a confused conception of…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. NEW MINISTRY’S POLICY. OPPOSITION CRITICISM. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Aug. 1 1905]; Sep. 19 1905. The new Federal Ministry has made its debut in Parliament in such a manner as to advertise at the same time its attitude and policy. The Prime Minister in the House and Senator Playford, who leads in the Senate and holds the portfolio of Defence, respectively read to their rather astonished hearers in a few moments a long list of measures catalogued in a type-written document. This was the Ministerial manifesto, which was original in brevity and in the manner of its…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. QUEENSLAND SESSION CLOSED. END OF THE COAL STRIKE. THE CARRIAGE OF MAILS. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Jan. 31 1905]; Mar. 23 1905. The Queensland Session is over, the Morgan Ministry is triumphant, its Franchise and Elec­tions Bills are now the law of the State. The sittings were orderly. The Government majority remained solid in the Assembly, while the majority adverse to them in the Council wisely contented itself with insisting upon practical amendments to which the Premier with equal judgment consented gracefully. The Labour Party had no special exhilaration at…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. REID MINISTRY AND MR. WATSON. PERSONAL ATTACKS. STATE ASSEMBLIES IN SESSION. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Sep. 27 1904; Nov. 16 1904. The fate of the Reid Ministry still hangs in the balance, and is likely to remain in suspense for a little. The Labour Opposition and the Government, through their leaders, have placed their contrasted doctrines before the public. Mr. Watson was by common consent described as tame and ineffective. Mr. Reid was virile and effective, not contenting himself with a defence of his Cabinet but attacking his opponents and their policy with…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. LABOUR MINISTRY’S TROUBLES. THE DEFENCE OF THE COLONY. POLITICAL INSTABILITY. FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT SYDNEY, Jul. 19 1904; Aug. 25 1904. Winter has merited its name this year. There has been less sunshine and much more cloud and cold, while for the last ten days the weather has surpassed all recent experiences. Gales on the coast have caused the foundering of one steamer and damage to many more, have imprisoned others in local harbours, and scattered the smaller fry to the nearest havens. Inland we have had storms and tempests, rain and then more rain, flooding…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE COMMONWEALTH AND THE STATES. CONSTITUTIONAL PRINCIPLES. WORK OF THE HIGH COURT. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [May 10 1904]; Jul. 18 1904. Sydney is once more the centre. The Governor-General and Lady Northcote have arrived, receiving a ceremonious, official, and cordial popular welcome. They have gone for the coming three months into residence at Government House, where they will dispense the same generous but discriminating hospitality that proved successful beyond expectation in Melbourne. We have had representatives of the King who have been too lavish and…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE LABOUR MINISTRY. MR. WATSON’S POSITION. PARTY MANOEUVRES. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Apr. 26 1904; Jun. 14 1904. The death of the Deakin Ministry has created a sensation throughout the whole Commonwealth. Though long expected, and by many long desired, often foreshadowed by the Prime Minister himself, and watched at every stage by the public and the Press, the shock of the actual event was rather deepened than diminished by this train of preparations, to which it came as a culmination. It was the passing of the first Federal Government, which, in spite of…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE CHOOSING OF THE NEW CAPITAL. PROBABLE DEADLOCK. JARRING ELEMENTS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Apr. 12 1904; May 23 1904. New South Wales has had and will have to submit to much mockery—some of it tolerant and good-natured, but most of it contemptuous or bitter—because of our urgency in steadily insisting that the site of the future Federal capital shall be selected without delay. Whatever measure of success has attended our efforts has been due to our own exertions, it might almost be said our unaided exertions, for we have had little assistance from any other…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. LABOUR PARTY’S POWER. THE SECRET OF ITS SUCCESS. TASK OF CABINET MAKING. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Feb. 9 1904; Mar. 19 1904. Like the bugle call in Tennyson’s song the Prime Minister’s Melbourne speech on the unstable condition of Commonwealth politics has sent its “wild echoes flying” on every side, the reverberations as they are borne back to us from distant centres seeming to be multiplying rather than dying. The reasons for this are not far to seek. Though the Prime Minister only said aloud what everyone has been whispering since the elections, he said it…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. SUCCESSES OF THE LABOUR SECTION. TWO OPPOSITIONS. THE QUESTION OF COALITION. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Dec. 22 1903; Jan. 28 1904. The Commonwealth elections resembled nothing so much as the triangular duel in Marryat’s “Midshipman Easy”, except that in this instance each combatant was doubly armed and shot at both his adversaries. The Ministry suffered most at the hands of both of its antagonists and the Opposition little. The Labour Party triumphed at the expense of each. Yet for all that the fundamental situation is not altered. As parties went to the…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. ELECTORAL CAMPAIGN. THE LABOUR PROGRAMME. RIVAL POLITICAL LEADERS. FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Nov. 17 1903; Dec. 22 1903. The event of the week has been the passage of the Naval Defence Agreement Bill with New Zealand. The three contracting parties—the Admiralty, the Commonwealth, and the Island Colony—have now sanctioned the arrangement provisionally entered into in London last year. The new and more powerful ships of war provided for are expected to arrive at Easter, and the doubled subsidy will at once begin to run. Of course, the principle to which effect is…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. MR. CHAMBERLAIN’S POLICY. THE UNITY OF THE EMPIRE. LOYALTY AND PATRIOTISM. FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Nov. 10 1903; Dec. 19 1903. The strength of the sporting element in Australia can be gauged in many ways. It can be gauged by the perpetual discussion it provokes, the prominence given to its news all the year round, and by its culminations in outbursts of public interest at the time of its chief festivals. Every form of sport has its season and its throngs of votaries. Our daily newspapers are never free from the notes and comments intended to appeal to them, while…