The Letters

FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. RECORD OF PROSPERITY. FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 2 1906; Aug. 11 1906. On Saturday, June 30, accounts were closed in the Commonwealth and all the States for the financial year 1905–6. This completes our first quinquennium under federation, which closes brilliantly with the happiest auspices for the whole of Australia. The figures of our public accounts tell but one tale, and though there are differences between the various sections of the continent they amount only to degrees of pros­perity. Sound trade, abundance of money, increase of savings, large returns…
Tags: Deakin
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. RIVAL POLITICAL PARTIES. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 9 1906; Aug. 17 1906. Half the Commonwealth Senate and the whole of the House of Representatives are due for elec­tion this year, probably about the end of Novem­ber, and already the campaign is in progress. Parliament sits in Melbourne, but Mr. Reid is touring in Queensland as if it were still in recess. He has already carried out platform expeditions here and in Victoria and is preparing for further onsets upon different portions of the continent. If he is not successful at the polls it will not be for…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE PROTECTION OF TRADE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 16 1906; Aug. 24 1906. The law-making propensity is not peculiar to Britons within or without the Empire, but assuredly it is vigorous enough among them all. Of course every Legislature is intended to legis­late and is likely to keep on legislating even when no real need asserts itself. Members being obliged to recommend themselves to their con­stituents periodically can only do so by the number and attractiveness of their fresh proposals for new Bills. These are often little more than amendments of…
Tags: Deakin, Reid
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE HIGH COURT. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 23 1906; Sep. 18 1906. The Commonwealth is still young, quite young enough to be studied for its promise as well as its performance. Every principal Act it passes deals with more than its immediate subject-matter. It shows a tendency. It establishes a precedent. It builds up some part of the new Federal structure which is beginning to overtop the State edifices conspicuously in places. Take the amending Judiciary Bill, which last week passed the House without amendment. Nothing could be simpler or shorter. For the…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE VICTORIAN VOTE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 30 1906; Sep. 6 1906. The crux of the session and of the political situation generally will be reached very shortly. What is really most momentous in both, from a broad Australian point of view, may be matter for controversy; what is most interesting to Sydney is quite plain; but the really important question in Federal politics is unfortunately still miscon­strued in this State. Mr. Reid continues his round of political meetings in Queensland, delivering and redelivering familiar diatribes against communistic…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE BUDGET. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Aug. 6 1906; Sep. 25 1906. Last week Sir John Forrest established a record in the self-governing dominions when he intro­duced his thirteenth Budget to the House of Representatives. Eleven times in Western Australia as Premier and Treasurer, and twice in the Federal Parliament as Treasurer, it has fallen to his lot to propound the financial policy of the Government of the day. Even the late Mr. Seddon has been outdone in this particular respect. In another way, too, the Australian has had a singularly happy experience, since…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE BUDGET AND ITS CRITICS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT SYDNEY, Aug. 14 1906; Oct. 3 1906. The Australian Press, though nothing near as extravagant as that of the United States, has an insatiable appetite for sensations. Where these do not exist, they seize the slightest excuse for creating them so as to keep up excitement by artificial means until some better pretext for stimulating the jaded appetites of their readers happens to occur. Everything is sacrificed to this appetite. One has only to turn these pages a few weeks after publication to be struck by the painful…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. NATIONAL DEFENCE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Aug. 20 1906; Oct. 6 1906. “The General Scheme of Defence for Australia” supplied by the “Committee of Imperial Defence” at the request of Mr. Deakin is in its field as important as the huge schemes for dealing with our State loans of nearly £240,000,000 falling due within the next half century. The latter pro­posals, though they profoundly affect our future, are but imperfectly understood by the public, and are only beginning to be discussed by a few of our most thoughtful public men. So far the schemes of Sir John…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. LABOUR AND THE MINISTRY. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. [Aug. 27 1906]; Oct. 25 1906. Australian politics exhibit rising temperatures; one general election is certain and another pro­bable this year, three more are due in the early part of next year. Out of our seven Legislatures only those of Western Australia and Tasmania, lately elected, appear to conform to the normal standard. All the rest are perturbed by the imminence of changes which affect the conduct of current affairs by anticipation. Commonwealth politics are at an extremely critical stage, party complications…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE NEW ZEALAND TARIFF. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Sep. 3 1906; Oct. 30 1906. Never did “a bolt from the blue” startle any one so much as the Prime Minister’s tariff preference to the Mother Country to our baffled Free Traders. Its campaign material, all to hand, collected with endless pains and at great cost, depended for its effect upon a continuance of the parliamentary regime of last year, when a great deal of most important legislation, passed in spite of them, happened to be general in its nature and without party colouring. That suits the Opposi­tion,…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. AMENDMENTS OF THE CONSTITUTION. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Sep. 10 1906; Nov. 6 1906. In Australia just now it is finance here, finance there, and finance everywhere, because all the States are publishing their annual balance-sheets. Happily these are of a highly satisfactory character. Tasmania, of course, is content to plough along without any great effort at expansion. Western Australia, too, has to make up for her losses in consequence of the reductions in her tariff due to Federation and to the marked increase in the proportion of her population of tender…