The Letters

FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE VETO IN THE TRANSVAAL. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Apr. 2 1906; May 29 1906. The Prime Minister’s second speech at Adelaide taken together with its forerunner at Ballarat has diminished the disappointment of his friends but increased that of his opponents. What his purpose may be is only known to himself, for none of his colleagues have broken silence, and his followers from their comments seem equally abroad. The effect of his two utterances is not clear either to the Press, and yet to a spectator it seems clear enough. At Ballarat he was occupied in…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE PREMIERS’ CONFERENCE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Apr. 9 1906; Jun. 1 1906. The Premiers’ Conference is now in full swing in this city, and in most respects follows the customs established by previous gatherings con­fined to the States. Mr. Carruthers presides, and the proceedings are in private. But in other respects it differs first in being incomplete and next because its business has been carefully con­cealed up to the last moment. That Western Australia should be unrepresented is serious; that the public should have been left in ignorance of the questions…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE SYDNEY CONFERENCE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Apr. 16 1906; Jun. 4 1906 The disparagement of Conferences, whether Federal or State, appears to be a confirmed habit with our local Press, and supplies one more evidence of its provinciality. Both our papers blundered badly when they belittled the Hobart Conference last year. It is true that nothing was done there except to discuss the situation created between the Commonwealth and the States by the financial clauses in the Federal Constitution; but, as was insisted in the Morning Post at the time, this was an…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. HUGE IRRIGATION SCHEME. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, [Apr. 23 1906]; Jun. 12 1906. The conclusion of a tentative agreement by the Premiers of New South Wales, Victoria, and South Australia providing for a dis­tribution of the waters of the Murray is properly accepted as an event of capital magnitude. The Prime Minister, whose first great political enthusiasm twenty years ago was for water conservation and irrigation, is apparently still as ardent in his conviction of its value to Australia, since he pronounces the understanding arrived at the most important ever…
Tags: Deakin
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. IMMIGRATION PROPOSALS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Apr. 30 1906; Jun. 26 1906. The last Premiers’ Conference has, as usual, settled nothing finally. It has no power to do more than arrive at certain understandings between the responsible heads of existing State Administrations, who may not survive or may not obtain the sanction of their Legislatures for the agreements arrived at. But nevertheless it has most distinctly helped forward a great many matters by educating public opinion, while the Murray River partition, though only involving three States and but…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. GENERAL ELECTION TACTICS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, May 7 1906; Jun. 30 1906. Parliament meets on June 5, that is to say, the Commonwealth Parliament which at present is in the full focus of public attention assembles in Melbourne on that date. The State Legisla­tures will be summoned later, for none of them apprehend a dissolution this year, and all of them rejoice to have the critical eye of the country directed upon their big brother instead of them­selves. Two of those Ministerial transformations to which we have become accustomed in local politics have been…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. A “CINDERELLA” PROVINCE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, May 14 1906; Jul. 4 1906. Our pleasant autumn weather has been system­atically utilised of late for touring. The Governor-General has made acquaintance for the first time with the chief townships of the north­west fed from the great plains stretching to the far interior for which they are the railway termini. Orange and Bathurst at high elevations are summer resorts, agriculturally prosperous and enjoying a delightful climate. Dubbo and Bourke, on the other hand, face a torrid heat in January and February, which…
THE LATE MR. SEDDON. AN AUSTRALIAN APPRECIATION. [May 21 1906]; Jun. 27 1906. We have just received from our Sydney Correspondent a letter which, though written on May 21—three weeks before Mr. Seddon died—seems to have been inspired by a premonition of that sad event in Australasian history. Our correspondent writes: The Right Hon. Richard Seddon, Premier of New Zealand, may be called the principal political personage in Australasia. His friends say as much openly and more think so. When a year ago his health caused them the greatest anxiety the mere prospect of his disappearance from public…
Tags: Deakin, Reid
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. A PROTECTION ELECTION CRY. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, May 21 1906; Jul. 13 1906. The Prime Minister has just paid his long-promised visit to Sydney, where it is no figure of speech to say that he is little likely to be recog­nised by the Man in the Street. Mr. Deakin, an infrequent visitor to Sydney, is little visible even in Victoria, and may easily be overlooked in Melbourne itself, where his home is and always has been. Nothing but absolute public necessity drags him from his retirement anywhere, though our newspapers always contrive to convey the impression…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE JAPANESE SQUADRON. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, May 28 1906; Jul. 17 1906. The harbour near the city never looked more beautiful than a week ago, when the half-moon frontage of Circular Quay sparkled with innumerable electric lights of welcome to the visiting Japanese Squadron. On the other side of Government House grounds Farm Cove was filled with dazzling light from the Powerful and sister ships of the British Fleet. The throng of large, brilliantly-glowing ferry boats on their several routes crossed and recrossed each other more rapidly than usual. Few, if…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. MR. SEDDON’S LAST WARNING. THE NEW SESSION. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jun. 11 1906; Jul. 19 1906. The sudden death of the Right Hon. Richard Seddon, of which we heard this morning, came as a shock, but not wholly a surprise. He returned to Sydney on Saturday morning, having transacted business with Sir William Lyne in the train until after midnight. Then followed a very busy day, a farewell dinner, a theatre party and late supper, after which he boarded the Oswestry Grange in the early hours of Sunday morning. He had been living at this rate and under the same…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE RABBIT PEST. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jun. 18 1906; Jul. 31 1906. The romance of the rabbit is an Australian story not easily intelligible to dwellers in colder climates with denser population, where his marvellous fecundity and ingenuity are unrealised. Recent events have elevated him here into a public and political importance greater than he has ever attained. It is not the first time that he has appeared before our local legislatures, all of which at one time or another have been occupied with his depredations in past years, but it is the first occasion…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. DIFFICULTIES OF PREMIERS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jun. 25 1906; Aug. 8 1906. Midwinter finds the Federal Parliament deep in the work of the session and all the State Legis­latures preparing to follow suit. Mr. Carruthers and Mr. Bent have made preliminary speeches giving an outline of their intentions so as to prepare the public mind for what is coming. What is thought of their promises and anticipatory explanations one cannot tell. The criticisms on our Premier from the Labour members who consti­tute the official Opposition in New South Wales are not intended…