The Letters

FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE FALLEN MINISTRY. DEFEAT INEVITABLE. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 3 1905; Aug. 11 1905. What will happen next in our politics is never easy to predict, but the present crisis has no peculiarly Australian character. When the materials for an explosion are lying close together, as they have been in the Federal Parliament for many months, any spark from anywhere will produce a catastrophe. Readers of the Morning Post at all events cannot have been surprised when the cable told them that Mr. Reid’s Ministry had fallen. It was always plain that this might occur…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. COLONIAL BUSINESS METHODS. MR. DEAKIN’S CABINET. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 11. 1905; Aug. 18 1905. Mr. Allerdale Grainger, who has been Agent-General for South Australia for several years, has returned at the expiration of his term of office. After living in London at the heart of the Empire under circumstances which brought him into close touch with all the influences affecting Australia and her interests, he makes no secret of his discontent. All the representa­tives of the Colonies are, in his judgment, “handicapped by the antiquated business methods of…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. CONDITION OF THE COUNTRY. POLITICS AND LABOUR QUESTIONS. FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Jul. 18 1905; Aug. 23 1905. The “Australian correspondents” of English newspapers are still serving as targets for animadversion here and come under censure from all quarters. Mr. McLean, the joint partner of Mr. Reid in the late Federal Government, wrote an indignant official letter to our State Premiers upon a statement of a financial correspondent of the London Times, in which the outlook here was painted in the blackest colours, and the prospects of the export trade for 1905…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. PREMIERS & NEW ZEALAND. WORK AND WORKMEN. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Jul. 25 1905]; Sep. 12 1905. There are now three Premiers in Australasia, absolute contrasts in person, policy, and career, who are exhibiting a remarkable likeness to each other in their fondness for one particular theme. Mr. Seddon, if not its discoverer, was the first to make continuous use of it, and the success which attended what Mr. Chamberlain once called the “booming eloquence” of that masterful politician when directed to the subject probably encouraged imitators. The beauties, riches…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. NEW MINISTRY’S POLICY. OPPOSITION CRITICISM. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Aug. 1 1905]; Sep. 19 1905. The new Federal Ministry has made its debut in Parliament in such a manner as to advertise at the same time its attitude and policy. The Prime Minister in the House and Senator Playford, who leads in the Senate and holds the portfolio of Defence, respectively read to their rather astonished hearers in a few moments a long list of measures catalogued in a type-written document. This was the Ministerial manifesto, which was original in brevity and in the manner of its…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE PRESS AND POLITICS. FEDERAL CAPITAL SITE. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Aug. 8? 1905]; Sep. 27 1905. Unrest is the prevailing political temper, despite the encouraging reports from every part of the Commonwealth upon the financial prospects of the year. The basis of business is sound, and banking is better than it has been for years; general trade is steady, while rural prospects are most hopeful. What more could be desired? Save that, as is usual at this slack season of the year, there are a few hundred men unemployed in one or two State capitals there is not a…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE BANK QUESTION. PRODUCE AND TRANSPORT. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT, [Aug. 15 1905]; Oct. 5 1901. Mr. Carruthers has the defects of his qualities, but he is at least an expert politician in the sense that he knows what members want and sees that they get it. The Press is always in his mind and he would gladly have its chief representatives at his back, but when he is forced to make a choice between Press and Parliament there is no hesita­tion in his decision. He is to be found with his fellow members every time. In the same way he would gladly serve his native city…
Tags: Deakin
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. THE PREMIER’S POSITION. LABOUR PARTY TACTICS. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Aug. 22 1905]; Oct. 10 1905. Lovers of political sensation are fortunately situated in Australia, since, when all our Legisla­tures are in session, it must be an unusual week that closes without spectacular incidents some­where. During that just terminated we had two remarkable occurrences not very easy to under­stand. In Victoria the head of the Government, Mr. Bent, having suddenly indicated the possi­bility of an abrupt reversal of the chief article of his policy, followed it up by using the…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. FINANCIAL QUESTIONS. IMMIGRATION PROPOSALS. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Aug. 28 1905]; Oct. 13 1905. Sir John Forrest’s first Budget was not sensational, though he cannot claim credit on that account, because there was no opportunity for leaving the beaten track if he had desired to do so. The Constitution itself, with more or less wisdom, attempted to regulate in advance finances of the future Commonwealth and of the States for the first decade of the Federation. Its provisions on this head, though few and simple in themselves, are not capable of being described in…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. LABOUR AND IMMIGRATION. LIQUOR LAW AMENDMENT. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Sep. 4 1905]; Oct. 19 1905. The Englishman who takes an interest in Australia usually begins, and often ends, by judging us by the parts of our politics which impinge upon his own Imperial policy—when he has one. If he goes further he probably concerns himself only about our prosperity in the gross or glances, out of curiosity, at some of our legisla­tive experiments. In some respects to-day his course is easy. About our prosperity there is no question; every return proves it. Sir John Forrest’s…
Tags: Deakin
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. PUBLIC AFFAIRS. DEFENCE AND IMMIGRATION. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Sep. 11 1905]; Oct. 24 1905. The relative importance of recent developments in public affairs is certainly not apparent from the columns of our newspapers either in New South Wales or beyond its borders. They do not neglect much intentionally, and that only for party reasons, but establish no proportion between the space and prominence they accord to little local happenings or events of real magnitude and fruitfulness. The result is that their readers are left with at best a confused conception of…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. FINANCIAL POSITION. STATE RESPONSIBILITIES. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Sep. 18 1905]; Oct. 31 1905. Australian finance is not a taking topic, but it is far too important to be passed over in silence. The figures are always available, but their inter­pretations at home are often amazing to us. It is too often forgotten that our public accounts differ from those of other oversea dependencies as much as they differ from those of the Mother Country, because our circumstances are different. Our methods and stages of development must be constantly borne in mind when…
FEDERATED AUSTRALIA. MR. CARRUTHERS’ ATTITUDE. PROSPECTS FOR IMMIGRANTS. FROM OUR SYDNEY CORRESPONDENT. [Sep. 25? 1905]; Nov. 13 1905. If Mr. Carruthers would only keep his temper—or, perhaps, to speak more accurately, if he would get rid of it—he would do much better. A more composed, less irritable, and a much less complaining note would add to his dignity and be conducive to better relations with Press and public. After all, the fates are not unkind to him. He is in office, with a solid, if small, majority and a group of fairly capable colleagues who are thoroughly loyal. The Legislature…