‘Federated Australia’, Herbert Cotton’s tribute to Sir Henry Parkes

Federated Australia, Herbert Cotton’s tribute to Sir Henry Parkes

‘Federated Australia’, Herbert Cotton’s tribute to Sir Henry Parkes, appeared in the Daily Telegraph on Monday 9 July 1900 and celebrated the passage of the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Bill (UK) through the House of Lords on 5 July 1900. Queen Victoria signed the Royal Commission of Assent on 9 July 1900, enacting the Australian Constitution.

(National Library of Australia, nla.obj-135490036)

 

Letters authored in 1900

THE AUSTRALIAN UNION. PREPARATIONS IN SYDNEY. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Nov. 29 1900; Jan. 3 1901. Sydney has been simmering rather angrily for the past month, despite what may fairly be termed a temperate season, and is now fast approaching boiling point. Our preparations for the inaugura­tion of the Commonwealth are the immediate cause, though the high pressure at which the local Parlia­ment has been kept working, with a view to its early prorogation, has contributed to the general friction. Not that the Lyne Ministry is in present peril. If it were the danger must arise from…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. DIFFICULTIES TO BE FACED. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Dec. 4 1900; Jan. 8 1901. On the 1st of January the Parliament of Great Britain will be at last enabled to behold, Jove-like, the new power which has sprung full-armed from a head which is aching after even a perfunctory discussion of the future estate of its offspring. The coming new Commonwealth is already hailed as, in some sense, a portent, having discovered to a surprised Europe even in the hour of birth a fervent loyalty to her parent as unforeseen as was her capacity for service. Loyalty to herself…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. QUESTIONS FOR DECISION. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Dec. 11 1900; Jan. 22 1901. Lord Hopetoun’s arrival having been at last fixed for the 15th inst., we are in a position to complete our preparations for receiving him. Of course, this will be done in a comparatively unpretentious manner, the chief rejoicings being reserved for the proclamation of the Commonwealth on New Year’s Day. Those arrangements are now proceeding satisfactorily, though they are still retarded by Sir William Lyne’s apparent determination not to allow a flag to fly nor a cracker to be…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. SYDNEY’S CELEBRATIONS. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Dec. 18 1900; Jan. 23 1901. The Governor-General has arrived. In perfect weather he had an almost perfect welcome—not in the city, the streets of which are like most other streets of modern cities during business hours. “Sydney—it is the harbour”, and our demonstra­tion was made in a theatre which no capital in the world can surpass, and with a display that few ports could hope to parallel. Lord Hopetoun arrived in the flagship Royal Arthur, entering from the sea between two lines of men-of-war and merchant…
THE NEW COMMONWEALTH. MR. BARTON’S SELECTION. FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. SYDNEY, Dec. 31 1900; Feb. 5 1901. When Mr. Barton was sent for on Christmas Eve to undertake the formation of a Commonwealth Cabinet the tension of public feeling, which had been somewhat severe owing to Sir William Lyne’s failure in the task, was considerably eased. The Federal spirit was quickened, and the rejoicings of those who had brought about the union, intermitted during the period of doubt, were again resumed. Sir W. Lyne’s difficulty was to find any colleagues; Mr. Barton’s has been to pick from among the…